Wto Government Procurement Agreement

Amp signatories are required to publish summary notices on the potential to purchase contracts covered by the agreement. Each member has identified publications in which these sales opportunities are displayed. Publications are listed in Appendix II (local link). When a supplier believes that this agreement is in violation, it is encouraged to consult with the purchasing entity to resolve the issue. If such consultations do not result satisfactory, each undersigned government should provide that it imposes timely, transparent and effective non-discriminatory procedures that would allow suppliers to challenge alleged breaches of the agreement. Suppliers may be required to initiate an appeal procedure within a specified period of time (no less than ten days) from the date the basis of the complaint was known. Disputes must be heard by an impartial independent tribunal or audit body that is not interested in the outcome of the award of the contract. Dispute proceedings must be completed „in due course.“ The GPA is a multi-lateral agreement within the WTO framework, which means that not all WTO members are parties to the agreement. Currently, the agreement consists of 20 parties, with 48 WTO members. Thirty-six WTO members/observers participate in the GPA committee as observers. Of these, 12 members are in the process of joining the agreement. As a result, the first Tokyo Round Code on Government Procurement was signed in 1979 and came into force in 1981. It was amended in 1987 and the amendment came into force in 1988.

The parties to the agreement then negotiated the extension of the scope and scope of the agreement, in parallel with the Uruguay Round. Finally, on 15 April 1994, a new public procurement agreement (GPA 1994) was signed in Marrakech at the same time as the WTO agreement, which came into force on 1 January 1996. The revised GPA, which came into force on 6 April 2014, is attracting increasing attention around the world, but the liberalisation of public procurement is not a completely new idea. Within the OECD, efforts have been made at an early stage to ensure that public procurement is subject to internationally accepted trade rules. The case was then included in the Tokyo trade negotiations under the GATT in 1976. The Public Procurement Agreement (GPA) requires that open, fair and transparent conditions of competition be guaranteed for public procurement.